Cynthia Enloe

Cynthia Enloe is Research Professor in the Department of International Development, Community, and Environment, with affiliations with both Women’s and Gender Studies and Political Science at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. She has taught in the UNU-GEST Programme.

Email: cenloe@clarku.edu

Cynthia Enloe’s career has included Fulbrights in Malaysia and Guyana, guest professorships in Japan, Britain, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, as well as lectures in Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Germany, Portugal, Chile, Vietnam, Korea, Colombia, Bosnia, Turkey, and at universities around the U.S. Her writings have been translated into Spanish, Turkish, French, Portuguese, Japanese, Korean, Swedish, Icelandic and German. She has published in Ms. Magazine, and appeared on National Public Radio, Al Jazeera, C-Span and the BBC. Professor Enloe’s fourteen books include Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women’s Lives (2000), The Curious Feminist (2004) and Globalization and Militarism (2007; updated edition, March, 2016 ) as well as Nimo’s War, Emma’s War: Making Feminist Sense of the Iraq War, ( 2011), The Real State of America: Mapping the Myths and Truths about the United States (co-authored with Joni Seager) (2011), and Seriously! Investigating Crashes and Crises as if Women Mattered (2013). Her new, thoroughly updated and revised 2nd edition of Bananas, Beaches and Bases was published by University of California Press, 2014. She has been awarded Honorary Doctorates by Union College (2005), the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies (2009), Connecticut College (2010), the University of Lund, Sweden (2012) and Clark University (2014). She currently serves on the editorial advisory boards of International Feminist Journal of Politics, Security Dialogue, Women, Politics and Policy, International Political Sociology, Critical Military Studies, and Politics and Gender. Professor Enloe’s feminist teaching and research have explored the interplay of gendered politics in the national and international arenas, with special attention to how women’s labor is made cheap in globalized factories (especially sneaker factories) and how women’s emotional and physical labor has been used to support many governments’ war-waging policies—and how diverse women have tried to resist both of those efforts. Racial, class, ethnic and national identity dynamics, as well as pressures shaping ideas about femininities and masculinities, are common threads throughout her studies.

Presentations and publications